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Get Tight with a 3D Printed Ratchet

One of the first “big” news stories to catch the mainstream media’s attention was about a wrench built through additive manufacturing (AM). People just couldn’t get their heads around the idea that an object with moving parts could be built in basically one step. Time and the emergence of actual 3D printed oddities have faded recollections of the wrench from the public mind, but tool creation is still one of the strongest applications of AM.

A company named Roller Clutch Tools has gone back to the basics of AM and used the technology to build a new version of the venerable ratchet. Called the “New Ratchet 3rd Generation”, or NR3G for short, the wrench has a patented design that employs compression rather than sheer to tighten or loosen nuts and bolts. 

The NR3G is intended to be produced and repaired through 3D printing alone. Courtesy of Roller Clutch Tools.

So what’s so great about the NR3G? From the Kickstarter page:

 The ‘New Ratchet 3rd Generation’ is a gearless ratchet, which uses rollers rather than gears. Rollers are stronger, faster and safer to use. They also provide the added benefit of a zero back swing. When you rotate the handle the rollers are squeezed between the spindle and the head. This action locks the clutch in a uniform and circular pattern and applies a tremendous amount of torque to the attached socket.

3D printing first came into the picture when Roller Clutch Tools used the technology for rapid prototyping. Since then, the company had continued to use AM to build the clutch spindles from laser sintered stainless steel, and manufactures handles from ABS plastic and a 3D printer. The company claims one of its goals is the creation of completely AM-built tools that can be easily repaired.

Roller Clutch Tools has yet to reach its Kickstarter goal, but hopefully the attention gained from the ingenious device will garner interest from other financial backers. Below you’ll find the Kickstarter video for the NR3G.

- See more at: http://www.rapidreadytech.com/2013/08/get-tight-with-a-3d-printed-ratchet/#sthash.dZAxrpjP.dpuf

Get Tight with a 3D Printed Ratchet

One of the first “big” news stories to catch the mainstream media’s attention was about a wrench built through additive manufacturing (AM). People just couldn’t get their heads around the idea that an object with moving parts could be built in basically one step. Time and the emergence of actual 3D printed oddities have faded recollections of the wrench from the public mind, but tool creation is still one of the strongest applications of AM.

A company named Roller Clutch Tools has gone back to the basics of AM and used the technology to build a new version of the venerable ratchet. Called the “New Ratchet 3rd Generation”, or NR3G for short, the wrench has a patented design that employs compression rather than sheer to tighten or loosen nuts and bolts. 

The NR3G is intended to be produced and repaired through 3D printing alone. Courtesy of Roller Clutch Tools.

So what’s so great about the NR3G? From the Kickstarter page:

 The ‘New Ratchet 3rd Generation’ is a gearless ratchet, which uses rollers rather than gears. Rollers are stronger, faster and safer to use. They also provide the added benefit of a zero back swing. When you rotate the handle the rollers are squeezed between the spindle and the head. This action locks the clutch in a uniform and circular pattern and applies a tremendous amount of torque to the attached socket.

3D printing first came into the picture when Roller Clutch Tools used the technology for rapid prototyping. Since then, the company had continued to use AM to build the clutch spindles from laser sintered stainless steel, and manufactures handles from ABS plastic and a 3D printer. The company claims one of its goals is the creation of completely AM-built tools that can be easily repaired.

Roller Clutch Tools has yet to reach its Kickstarter goal, but hopefully the attention gained from the ingenious device will garner interest from other financial backers. Below you’ll find the Kickstarter video for the NR3G.

- See more at: http://www.rapidreadytech.com/2013/08/get-tight-with-a-3d-printed-ratchet/#sthash.dZAxrpjP.dpuf

 

RAPID READY TECHNOLOGY

 

Get Tight with a 3D Printed Ratchet

 

Published | By John Newman


One of the first “big” news stories to catch the mainstream media’s attention was about a wrench built through additive manufacturing (AM). People just couldn’t get their heads around the idea that an object with moving parts could be built in basically one step. Time and the emergence of actual 3D printed oddities have faded recollections of the wrench from the public mind, but tool creation is still one of the strongest applications of AM.

A company named Roller Clutch Tools has gone back to the basics of AM and used the technology to build a new version of the venerable ratchet. Called the “New Ratchet 3rd Generation”, or NR3G for short, the wrench has a patented design that employs compression rather than sheer to tighten or loosen nuts and bolts.

 

 

The NR3G is intended to be produced and repaired through 3D printing alone. Courtesy of Roller Clutch Tools.

 

So what’s so great about the NR3G? From the Kickstarter page:

 The ‘New Ratchet 3rd Generation’ is a gearless ratchet, which uses rollers rather than gears. Rollers are stronger, faster and safer to use. They also provide the added benefit of a zero back swing. When you rotate the handle the rollers are squeezed between the spindle and the head. This action locks the clutch in a uniform and circular pattern and applies a tremendous amount of torque to the attached socket.

3D printing first came into the picture when Roller Clutch Tools used the technology for rapid prototyping. Since then, the company had continued to use AM to build the clutch spindles from laser sintered stainless steel, and manufactures handles from ABS plastic and a 3D printer. The company claims one of its goals is the creation of completely AM-built tools that can be easily repaired.

Roller Clutch Tools has yet to reach its Kickstarter goal, but hopefully the attention gained from the ingenious device will garner interest from other financial backers. Below you’ll find the Kickstarter video for the NR3G.

Source: Kickstarter

- See more at: http://www.rapidreadytech.com/2013/08/get-tight-with-a-3d-printed-ratchet/#sthash.FgTTh4iO.dpuf

 

 

NBC NEWS - Technology

 

Tesla says Model S gets best NHTSA safety

 

rating ever

 

Aug. 20, 2013 at 11:29 AM ET

Tesla Model S sedans are seen parked in front of a row of new Tesla Superchargers outside of the Tesla Factory on August 16, 2013 in Fremont, Californ...
Justin Sullivan / Getty Images
Tesla Model S sedans are seen parked in front of a row of new Tesla Superchargers outside of the Tesla Factory on August 16, 2013 in Fremont, California.

While other manufacturers have been struggling to gain traction in a slow-growing battery car market, California start-up Tesla Motors has been exceeding even its own optimistic expectations with the big Model S sedan.

Offering a nearly 300-mile range with its optional 85 kilowatt-hour battery, three times more than most electric models, is one factor that appears to be boosting sales. But now, Tesla hopes there’ll be another reason for buyers to plug into the Model S: the maker is crowing that it has just received the best federal crash test results of any vehicle ever.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Tesla Model S received an overall five-star rating, as well as five stars in every individual test category. That’s something that only 1 percent of the vehicles NHTSA has tested have so far received. But the battery sedan also set a new record for the lowest likelihood for passenger injury ever achieved in the government tests.


While NHTSA doesn’t publish results greater than those coveted five stars, Tesla claims that the battery sedan actually should have received 5.4 stars because it exceeded every benchmark in the government Vehicle Safety Score metrics.

In a release trumpeting the test results, Tesla suggested the Model S benefited from adopting a completely new vehicle architecture.


“The Model S has the advantage in the front of not having a large gasoline engine block, thus creating a much longer crumple zone to absorb a high speed impact,” Tesla explained. “This is fundamentally a force over distance problem: the longer the crumple zone, the more time there is to slow down occupants at g loads that do not cause injuries. Just like jumping into a pool of water from a tall height, it is better to have the pool be deep and not contain rocks.”

Tesla notes that it “is possible” to “game” the testing process by bracing a vehicle in precisely the spots which would take the brunt of the impact in a crash test. But it insists that its own goal was to find weaknesses during internal development and improve the overall crashworthiness of the sedan. The maker pointed to one particular example.


““Of note, during validation of Model S roof crush protection at an independent commercial facility, the testing machine failed at just above 4 g’s,” it wrote. “While the exact number is uncertain due to Model S breaking the testing machine, what this means is that at least four additional fully loaded Model S vehicles could be placed on top of an owner’s car without the roof caving in.”


The NHTSA results are just the latest endorsement the battery-car has received. It was voted Car of the Year by Motor Trend magazine and earned the highest overall assessment ever from influential Consumer Reports magazine.


Those third-party raves have helped Tesla surge in sales in recent months, well exceeding its own expectations and boosting earnings for the first half of the year. It landed in the black for the second quarter, confounding the loss forecasts from most industry analysts.


That has led to a roughly fourfold increase in Tesla stock since the beginning of the year, shares closing Monday at $144.90 on the New York Stock Exchange.

 

The original article can be found here.

 

 


POPSCI.COM

 

How It Works: A 3-D Printer For Liver

 

Tissue

The first commercial 3-D bioprinter, Organovo's NovoGen MMX Bioprinter, is manufacturing functional liver tissues that will soon help biochemists test new drugs. Here’s a look at the printing process.

The NovoGen MMX Bioprinter Photograph by Timothy Hogan

Step 1: Engineers load one syringe with a bio-ink (A) made up of spheroids that each contain tens of thousands of parenchymal liver cells and a second syringe with a bio-ink (B) containing non-parenchymal liver cells that bolster cellular development and a hydrogel that helps with extrusion.

Step 2: Software on a PC wired to the bioprinter instructs a stepper motor attached to the robotic arm to move and lower the pump head (C) with the second syringe, which begins printing a mold. The mold looks like three hexagons arranged in a honeycomb pattern.

Step 3: A matchbox-size triangulation sensor (D) sitting beside the printing surface tracks the tip of each syringe as it moves along the x-, y-, and z- axes. Based on this precise location data, the software determines where the first syringe should be positioned.

Step 4: The robotic arm lowers the pump head (E) with the first syringe, which fills the honeycomb with parenchymal cells.

Step 5: Engineers remove the well plate­ (F)—which contains up to 24 completed microtissues, each approximately 250 microns thick­—and place it in an incubator. There, the cells continue fusing to form the complex matrix of a liver tissue.

 

This artcle can be found here.

 

 

 

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